Perspectives on Service Management Practices

Service Management Perspectives

Webinar on Friday 16-MAR-12

Ian Clayton (Principal – Service Management 101) and Kenneth Gonzalez “KENGON” (Managing Partner – Engaged Consulting)

Ian and Ken shared their perspectives in an informal manner.

Subject Matter

  • Fall from C-Level grace of ITSM, BSM and ITIL
  • How to successfully develop a service catalog
  • Next Generation Talk – what is around the corner?  Drop the IT from the front of ITSM
  • Framework Wars – futility of COBIT vs ITIL argument proposing that one is better than the other

Fall from C-Level grace of  ITSM, BSM and ITIL

Causes and Consequences

So what happened to the promise of ITIL and ITSM, why have they fallen from grace?

Dropping the IT from ITSM is not going to make a difference.

Need to explain ITSM and set senior stakeholder expectations.  Service Management applied to IT

What are the immediate and future consequences?

Budgets are constrained so explore concept of Quick Wins – which are only true if the customer declares it a quick win

Putting things in 30, 60 and 90 day containers is important.  Chop transformation project up into small bits

Build customer centric outcomes

There are so many sources of guidance that can be mined

Collaborate with communities of practice to solicit others viewpoints – LinkedIn, #Back2ITSM, #USMBOK etc.

How to successfully develop a service catalog

What is the definition of a service that a customer will recognise?

Example Product Catalogue.  Relates to a customer scenario and what they are doing on a daily basis

A service is a type of product

Bundling and Unbundling services

Build a service request catalog

Service offerings are different based on which customer segment is utilising it

Next Generation Talk

Is it time to press reset on the service management button?

Is it you or your management who have pressed the button?

How is what you have implemented working for you right now?

Define and agree what do you need

Practitioners believe that we need to do things differently.  Update or refresh our thinking

It is important to explore thinking and methods used by successful service provider organisations as a blueprint for next generation service management

Conversation is more vibrant around Next Generation.

We are not saying that anything is wrong however we must keep on the move – keep pace

Make sure are tools are sharp and training is even sharper

Do we need to press the reset button?  No we need a mechanism for maintaining momentum

Framework Wars

Futility of COBIT vs ITIL proposing that one is better than another

It is the height of lunacy to only choose one.

How do we compare and contrast guidance in order to apply it more effectively

Frameworks must be compared against the same criteria

Position USMBOK – 90% of which is outside of IT.  USMBOK – this is the language that I use

Customer centric thinking Outside-In conversation

What I consistently hear from clients is that ITIL is a dirty word because the significant project cost did not deliver the stated benefits or culture change.  The PINK folks talk about Attitudes, Behaviours and Culture.  Listen to what Troy has to say:  

Practitioner Radio Episode 21

Culture & ITSM Transformation Projects

Troy DuMoulin LINK

I agree that removing the IT from ITSM is not a panacea for all ills.  Service Management is not the exclusive domain of the IT organisation rather Customer Service Management, Field Service Management and Supply Chain Service Management have been around just as long.

How about we focus on defining and agreeing upon the set of Service Management Practices which become the overarching theme (roof) that sits above the different process frameworks (pillars).  (ITIL 2011 Edition, COBIT5, ISO/IEC 38500, ISO/IEC 20000, USMBOK, TIPU etc.)   

Service Management Practices aim to strengthen the focus on ‘Business and IT integration’ and also recognise the need for management of IT throughout the complete service lifecycle. 

You would not play a round of golf with only one club in your bag, so I agree with Ken that “it is the height of lunacy to choose one” over another framework.

 Internal / External Service providers should strive to achieve Service Excellence by choosing from a smorgasbord of good (not best) practice guidance rather than eat from the one dish.  Sitting at the table with the Business to talk about the desired outcomes they value is a given.  

“The Outside-In Service Management™ (OI-SM) program helps service organizations apply “Outside-In” thinking to service management initiatives, ensuring customer centricity, customer thinking, and the creation of value for customers.”

I have not religiously applied “Outside-In” to my client projects choosing to stay with proven Six Sigma Voice of the Customer [VOC] principles.  Basically the Voice of the Customer is a term that is used to describe the process of finding out what your customers want and need. This is accomplished by using surveys, stakeholder focus groups, workshops and actual interviews with your customers. 

In addition, Lean Six Sigma for Service also sets out the way to focus on customers.  LINK

A common mistake that I see with problem projects is that there is no concept of a joint Business and IT implementation team.  Moreover the delivery of stated benefits is not reviewed regularly with the customer and formal sign-off obtained before the project advances to the next stage.

Cracking video from the Process Excellence Network

It is about what your organisation does for Customers

[youtube http://youtu.be/8ckn9KjkgK0]

Process excellence improves the way you create and deliver value to customers,

In a Service Economy what you make is not the differentiator, it’s WHAT YOU DO and HOW YOU DO IT

02:22 You must understand and deliver what your customer needs better than your competitors

“No one knows everything, but everyone can learn something”

Sean Gregory Derrick

Have fun out in the market.  My next post will be after Easter

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