Tag Archives: #ITSM

What were the key notes from Pink12?

Opening video – Do you get it yet – are you ready?

IT Service Management is crying out for vision and leadership right now.

Leading practitioners are defining optimum practices in IT Service Management.

Attendees better understood the need to target the next level and how best to move another rung up the ladder.

The Pink team should be commended for inviting three creative and motivational speakers to address the conference plenary sessions.

Listening to conference key note speakers is the easy part.  Putting key learning’s into practice is much more challenging.

Creativity expert and author Sir Ken Robinson explains what can happen when passion meets natural talent.

When people arrive at the element, they feel as if they are in the zone and inspired to achieve high performance.

The book sets out how to enhance creativity and innovation in both personal and professional settings

“When people’s passion is excited they engage in innovation and development”

“If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original”

These quotes were shared on Twitter soon after his presentation ended.  

“The great danger we face as we become more intimately involved with our computers … is that we’ll begin to lose our humanness, to sacrifice the very qualities that separate us from machines.”

We have become more superficial shallow thinkers.

Attentiveness is the ability to tune out distractions.

Joanne Cantor describes how to preserve productivity under information overload

Why you need a balanced information diet

If you were unable to attend the conference or view the livestream feeds I hope that these clips provide an overview of  the ideas shared by these three key note speakers.

By taking these recommendations onboard attendees were energised to create Monday Morning Action Plans.

The conference opened with the rallying call that “ITSM is crying out for vision and leadership right now”

For me Leadership in Service Management Practices is about:

Acting as the Service Evangelist and inspiring those around you to achieve service excellence.

Fostering a service mindset and rewarding people who develop service acuity.

Adopting collaboration tools to engage with like minded professionals and continue the debate post conference.

Taking control of the future state vision back from Vendors into the ITSM community.

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Is it possible to predict the future of the Service Desk?


On Wednesday 18th January the good folk at BrighTalk arranged a Service Desk Summit.

I have selected two presentations from the day which resonated with me.

Future of the Service Desk – Get Social, Stay Relevant

Crystal Miceli (first 13 mins) & Bill Riley

Social Service DeskAdding social media channels to self service

Today, it’s about serving your customers across different channels, whether it’s web-based, online chat, mobile, social media like twitter or email because they are unlikely to pick up the phone.

New Service Desk Model attributes –

multi channel support

RSS feed subscription, forums, chatter

open lines of communication

collaborative knowledge capture and dissemination

and voice of the social customer drives new service development.

Service Desk 2.0

Brightalk webcast

Presentation Slides

James Finister (TCS)

A workforce that works seamlessly across platforms and that blurs the divide between private and corporate IT.

  • wants IT delivered on its own terms
  • will informally leverage social media and web based services to reduce their own workload

The goal of support is to provide value by helping customers to use services to do their jobs.

Self service and peer support become the default support mechanisms.

Tools will have to facilitate greater communication with other products.

Things we need to unlearn:

• SD activity targets

• The language of ITIl

• The importance of process

• Service Desk as SPOC

• The SD has all the answers

To what extent did the Brighttalk – Service Desk Summit provide a look into the future?

For me, these two presentations soared to the mountain peak whilst others remained in the safe environment of base camp.

Crystal Miceli and James Finister know what good looks like.  They are prepared to raise their heads above the parapet and provide a distinctive point of view.

So what other viewpoints are out there?

The Future Of The Service Desk Requires A “Customer-Savvy” Approach

John Rakowski – Forrester

Service desk professionals now operate in a business environment in which their end users or customers are “tech savvy.” This leads to a potential conflict spark point where IT customers believe that they have more IT know-how than the service desk.

The service desk and IT as a whole has to focus on becoming “customer savvy” to embrace these pressures.  Customer savvy starts firmly with the soft skills of I&O professionals. Simply, it is the ability to listen to your users/customers and to take on board their IT service suggestions.  Secondly, it is then the ability to apply your IT knowledge and experience to these suggestions from a risk, cost, and potential competitive perspective.

Jeff Weinstein (RightAnswers) adds – At the heart of a customer savvy service desk is the challenge for the team to really be on the pulse of its users and know how to address issues in proactive as well as reactive ways.

What Will the IT Help Desk of the Future Look Like?

John Paul Titlow

We’re already seeing clues about the future of the IT help desk today. The workforce is beginning to become more distributed and mobile, while the nature and number of devices people use day-to-day changes rapidly.

The trend toward socially infused customer support probably has only a limited relevance to company IT departments, whose “customers” are really internal staff.

Not only is the nature of the workforce itself becoming more mobile, but so too are the tools used by IT staff to fix problems. We’re already seeing really solid mobile and tablet apps for things like help desk software, remote desktop support, accessing servers via SSH or FTP and managing networks, to name a few. As smartphones and especially tablets become more ubiquitous and powerful, we can realistically expect to see even more robust administrative tools built for them

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/21028044]

In the future, it may not just be tablets and smartphones, but other connected devices as well. As the Web continues to grow outside of its original desktop boundaries, the list of devices IT departments need to support could grow as well. Anything that connects to the Internet and has a potential professional use is something that IT staff will at least need to be familiar with, even if they’re not fully supporting it

  

Next Generation of BMC Remedyforce Goes Social with Chatter

“Since it was introduced at Dreamforce, Remedyforce has helped IT departments of all sizes achieve greater success using social, mobile and open, cloud technologies,” said George Hu, executive vice president, salesforce.com. “BMC and salesforce.com are helping to automate the social enterprise by providing the leading IT help desk app in the industry built on Force.com.”

  

Goodbye service desk, hello to the collaborative IT support

Matt Rigby

Social IT support – what is it and how does it work? –

While traditional IT support is built on a closed “one-to-one” communication between you and your service desk, social IT support is built on an open “one-to-many” communication between you and your community

It’s relatively easy to introduce social IT into your business.  Since most, if not all of your employees or colleagues will already understand the concepts of social media through their use of platforms such as Facebook or Twitter, all you need to do is enable these ways of working within the workplace.  There are a growing number of social IT service management platforms emerging, either built entirely on the concepts of social media, or integrating some of these concepts to enable organisations to embrace this new way of working.

Service Desk 2017

“Lots of interest in @sdi_institute up and coming paper on Service Desk 2017.

If you’ve a view of the future get in touch if I forgot to ask!” @howardkendall

 

Anatomy of the Service Desk

LANDesk & the SDI are compiling a new whitepaper for 2012 –

The paper will look at how ITSM professionals spend their time, biggest time drains, and levels of pressure, while suggesting ways to improve service desk time-management and productivity.

Can you hear me now?  The future of the Service Desk.

ITSM Weekly The Podcast (Episode 63) -Service Desk of the Future 1 Of 5

Chris Dancy, Matthew Hooper and Matt Beran (twitter #ITSMWP) if you have the stamina to sit through 5 episodes!

MyPredictions for the “Service Desk” of the future

Will there be a Service Desk in the future?

The current view of the service desk as a single point of contact for users will not endure.  There will be virtualised operations from multiple locations with no concept of a centralised function.  This formation will become the default model in the short term to achieve cost savings through less facilities overheads – Telephony, Buildings etc. 

Where required to do so, service personnel will be spread across geographies to provide Follow the Sun coverage.

The Service Desk will need to transform into a Customer Interaction Capability that maintains the channel of the customer’s choice with little requirement for human voice interaction.

Non-voice technology – multi-channels – will enable users / customers to communicate just as easily in any format as they do by voice.

In the future more and more customer interactions will occur on the go to help keep track of information from cradle to grave.

“Phablets” Smartphones / tablets will be aware when utility (fit for use) is sub-optimal and will communicate directly with the SaaS product in the Cloud     

The future is about the Customer Experience. So can the Customer Interaction Capability keep up with their demanding expectations for instant gratification?

What will the new Customer Interaction Capability be called?  

Mult-Channel Service Centre, Service Interaction Centre, Service Storefront… 

Have your say – @WDGLL or whatdoesgoodlooklike@gmail.com


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A “World Class” Service for the Olympics

The term “World Class” is typically thrown around loosely by Marketing Departments, however the need to exceed customers expectations for the Olympic Games is a given.

At 01:51 the LOCOG (London Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games) CEO talks about the Customer Experience, how information will be consumed and how it can be enriched through social media.

Technology will improve access to competition information, as it happens, to audiences worldwide across an increasingly complex network of channels for consumption via multiple platforms.

The IT Service Management organisation that is in place to flawlessly deliver information at the Olympics must have a Zero Tolerance [of failure] policy in place and rigorously tested worst case scenarios, such as a large-scale cyber attack.

So let’s take a look at the Service Model.  Atos Origin is the prime service integrator and is responsible for leading a consortium of IT partners to design, build and operate the mission critical IT infrastructure and solutions that support the 2012 Games.  The Olympic Games are a complex mix of technology, processes and people across multiple partners with many varied dependencies.

A Technology Operations Centre has been established in Canary Wharf.  The TOC monitors and controls the IT systems that deliver the results from all the Olympic competitions to the world’s media in real time. For the London Games, Atos expects to process 30% more results data than in Beijing via the Competition Information System and Olympic Data Feed.

CISCO is providing an end to end borderless network infrastructure to make the Olympic Games the most connected sporting event the world has ever seen.

Let’s hope that the huge worldwide customer demand for consumption of live streaming and multimedia over the web can be met by the London Internet Exchange (LINX} which has 10 Points of Presence across London.

The Testing Programme was completed in late 2011 and the “Final Technical Rehearsal  2” will be executed from Feb to Apr.

01:16 – The Technology required for the Olympics is 10 times bigger than for the World Cup because of the number of simultaneous competitions happening at the same time.

SERVICE TRANSITION

The Service Validation and Testing process is described in the above core volume,  pages 150-174.  The purpose of service validation and testing is to ensure that a new or changed IT service is fit for purpose (Utility) and fit for use (Warranty).

“When validating and testing an end-to-end service, the interfaces to suppliers, customers and partners are important”.

By mapping out the service components in an end-to-end chain and defining where the service boundary lies it is possible to clarify and agree ownership responsibility and who needs to be involved in Service Rehearsals.

A Critical Success Factor (Page 174) states that “Providing evidence that the service assets and configurations have been built and implemented correctly in addition to the service delivering what the customer needs.”

In the event of a Major Incident

Atos has a Major Events Unit which has accumulated extensive and valuable know-how through its involvement with the world’s largest sporting events. This knowledge base is not only limited to the technology, Atos has  gathered an in-depth understanding of the processes, risks, people and issues behind an event.  Moreover BT has also mobilised a Major Incident Team for the Olympics.

 Not Even Good Service Management Practice Let Alone World Class

The decision by LOCOG (London Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games) to suspend the resale of tickets via the Ticketmaster website after problems is a possible portend for the future. The comments by the LOCOG CEO where he stated that “some frustration from prospective purchasers is inevitable” is very disappointing.

Whilst the core infrastructure has been tested and the operational readiness of the Technology Operations Centre has been confirmed, I still envisage that there will be service impacting issues due to insufficient end-to-end service acceptance and readiness testing. 

A comprehensive “End-to-End” Service Rehearsal should be conducted.  This exercise will highlight if there are any bottlenecks in the dissemination of information services to the Customer.    

For example, the Mobile Network Operators must provide assurance that video/data services can be delivered with no delay over the 3G infrastructure. 

Another concern that I have is that the Twitter platform will not be able to cope with volumes at peak event times and there will be a significant delay to the delivery of Tweets.   

Top of my worry list is that on the 05th August a global community will be watching the men’s 100m final and any service issues will be unacceptable and adversely impact the reputation of the IOC.

Let’s see how events unfold…

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Service Intelligence or Service Excellence?

In this post I will address the subject of service intelligence and provide an overview of the Multi -National Company offerings that help clients achieve excellence in Service Management Practices.

As we approach the winter holiday period and you consider selections for your reading list, I suggest you include the following:

 

Service Intelligence: Improving Your Bottom Line with the Power of IT Service Management

This is a book written for the business professional which talks about IT Service Management concepts in business terms.  Sharon Taylor, the @ITSMQueen, explains ITSM by cutting through the jargon.

“Good service management should be relatively invisible to the business. Services should operate as expected, and no service disruptions should be experienced. When support is needed, it should be provided efficiently and effectively, and it should resolve issues the first time. This is typically what we think of as a good service experience”.

This book is about finding those ITSM “a-ha” moments.  Coverage includes

  • Recognizing what excellent IT service looks like and assessing what you’re getting now
  • Selecting the best IT service providers and services for your needs
  • Spotting and rectifying trouble with internal or external supplier relationships
  • Making sure you don’t pay for services you don’t need
  • Negotiating services, requirements, levels, price, quality, and delivery
  • Leveraging ITSM practices without losing focus on the business
  • Creating business-focused service reports and scorecards that focus on what matters most

Introduction – (Illuminating Your Vulnerabilities, Capitalizing on your Strengths, ITSM – in Good Company)

Chapter 1 – ITSM 101: From Data to Wisdom (Data, Information, Knowledge, Wisdom)

Chapter 2 – ITSM: The Business Asset

Chapter 3 – The Service (Anatomy, Ingredients, Catalog, Agreement)

Chapter 4 – IT Service Provider (Types, Competencies, Sourcing)

Chapter 5 – The Negotiation (Decision Styles, Steps, Objectives, The Service Contract)

Chapter 6 – The Service Agreement (Core, Service Package, Description, Hours, Support, Reporting, Complaints, Reviews)

Chapter 7 – The Partnership in Action (Partner Compass, Service Monitoring, Trigger Points, Roles)

Chapter 8 – Service Performance in Action (Indicators, Dashboards)

Chapter 9 – The Bottom Line (Common Cents, Transformations)

Appendix A – IT Strategy Template

Appendix B – Service Contract Template

Appendix C – Service Agreement Template

Appendix D – References for Further Reading

“The mainstay of every business and IT partnership is the knowledge that ITSM requires a holistic approach from governance to operation and is an ongoing journey where a balanced view of the health of the partnership, the services, and the practices enable them to flourish. Even the best ideas at the right time can be made better with solid service management behind them”.

This book definitely explains ITSM or Service Management Practices in business language, however, based on my personal experience, I would have to say that it plays more to the needs of the Procurement function rather than the intended target audience of Business Unit decision makers.

A word of caution to the business reader.  Service Management process improvement programmes are sometimes initiated without fully understanding the business problems that need to be resolved.

 

Being intelligent about IT services & practices

Need to keep a pulse on how well IT Service Management Practices are doing.

Be prepared to invest in your people their attitudes and behaviours 

Promote cultural perception and acceptance about Service Management Practices

It is important to reward those people that shift their focus from a technology bias to demonstrate an end-to-end service-focussed culture. Linking levels of acceptance of new ways of working to the company performance appraisal scheme is a powerful way of incentivising people to change their behaviour.

Having capable people is one thing, but without a framework in which they can operate, it is difficult to share “good” practice and deliver results quickly.

 

Achieving Excellence in Service Management Practices

The Multi-National Companies (MNC), listed below, have invested heavily in optimising processes and developing the competency of their people.  They typically provide services from Multi-Client  locations which have over the years fine tuned ways of working. It is in their interest to focus on industrialisation which represents a relentless drive to discover how an activity is optimally done, then doing it in exactly the same way every time.  It eliminates redundancies, automates and standardises wherever possible, and then drives the work to the most cost-effective and competent workforce available.

HCL

New delivery models are emerging in IT Service management Space:

  • Standardization instead of customization- service providers are standardizing services across heterogeneous environments rather than customizing solutions for each client.
  • Opex instead of Capex- The cost basis of service delivery models are changing from capital expenditure (CAPEX) to operational expenditure (OpEx) – a sign of both innovation and maturity.
  • Alternate Cloud-based/SaaS based delivery – adoption of aspects of cloud computing and software as a service (SaaS) for flexible multi-tenant infrastructure management

 Cognizant

We look for the best and brightest when hiring so our management is constantly focused on making our workplace one that’s stimulating, positive, and inclusive. A workplace that’s dedicated to service excellence and reflects the highest standards of conduct.

IBM

Today, we could not even begin to achieve basic business goals without IT to serve as the central nervous system of the organisation.  This means that IT, in the 21st century, delivers a lot more than economic savings. It creates new possibilities, generates new business advantages, empowers new services and strategies, connects organisations with new customers and markets, and much more.

HP

To drive innovation, company growth, alignment between business and IT, your technology organisation must establish a sustainable, service-centric approach. Through service management you can reduce costs, meet compliance requirements, manage risk, and focus on fulfilling strategic business goals.

Deloitte In pursuit of IT excellence

The recent economic downturn has forced companies to examine many aspects of their operations. Firms have refocused on their value propositions and are increasingly challenging enabling functions like IT to deliver more.

In this new world, IT must improve efficiency and lower cost to serve yet continue to deliver new and improved capabilities and solutions to the business. It must offer flexible and rapid collaboration capabilities yet maintain robust and resilient security. It must scale and industrialise its delivery yet maintain tight alignment and responsiveness to the business units.

Accenture

CIOs must build service organizations that can choreograph IT services to respond to business threats and opportunities and drive the enterprise forward. Accenture IT Service Excellence helps CIOs achieve this dual imperative.

Achieving service excellence starts with understanding the needs of customers before focusing on internal capabilities such as processes, organisations design, sourcing strategies, tools and technology or skills and training.

Ernst & Young

IT effectiveness — provides a roadmap of potential IT Effectiveness improvements designed to help the IT function fulfill the evolving IT mandate of managing risk, rationalizing costs and creating value for the entire company.

Sharon Taylor stated that it is about “Selecting the best IT service providers and services for your needs.” One of the selection criteria should cover the relative merits of Internal vs External Service Providers. To what extent can an Internal Service Provider compete with the “Best of the Best”?

Collaboration and co-ordination across large or distributed organisations and service providers is significantly easier when there is a common language and the “best practice” frameworks provide a good starting point for achieving excellence in service management.

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Service Catalog Summit – Review and Key Observations

BrightTALK have organised a series of summits to address topical subjects. The format of these summits is a number of live webcast presentations which are recorded and available to replay.  On Wednesday 16th November the Service Catalog, which is perceived to be a hot topic, was covered.

The purpose of this lengthy post is to provide review comments for each presentation.  The presentations are organised by the webcast vote they received on the day [Lowest to Highest].  Whilst this approach is not comparing like for like (attendee numbers vary) it does provide an indication of how well the key messages were received by their target audience. 

At the end of the post I will share my own Point of View or key observations based on my deep experience of Service Management Practices which are vendor agnostic.

The Map is Not the Territory – Aligning Service Catalog to your Customer

Nathan Allchin (City of London Consultancy)

Webcast Vote = 2.7 / 5

There is a fundamental difference between a thing and its representation.

Customers like the idea of a Service Catalog because it reduces interaction costs, timescales and is useful for transaction purchases.

Service Providers like the idea of a Service Catalog because it reduces interaction costs, timescales and provides an opportunity for up sell.

Most of them don’t work as the Service Provider is not customer focussed, the Catalog has been built for ITILv2 which is out dated and it is hard to do, let alone well.

The ITILv2 and ITIL v3 definitions were examined in detail.

Outcomes – derived from performance of assets and are limited by pressure of certain constraints.

Services have value when they enhance the performance of these assets and reduce the grip of constraints.

Service Assets are a specific configuration of assets = a service.  Service Assets support external outcomes.

ITILv3 – Business Units & Service Assets.  Service Portfolio.  Value of Service Management.

This presentation set out a number of key concepts of the ITILv3 Service Strategy core volume, for example Service Assets and associated constraints.  In my experience a large number of practitioners are not comfortable with the need to describe the Capabilities and Resources required to create a Service Asset.  This is further evidenced by the fact that the ITIL 2011 Edition Service Strategy and Service Design core volumes have less focus on Service Assets which are the key building blocks for defining services. Service Providers (Internal & External) shy away from drilling down into the detail.

Catalog your SLAs

Kulvinder Bhupal – Principal Consultant CA

Webcast Vote = 3.1 / 5

How does IT simplify accessibility?

Challenges – become agile, control / reduce costs, consider cloud edge, disconnect between what IT provides and the perception of delivery.

Where do we start – define & measure, control IT spending, increase operational efficiency. Automate Service Delivery – e.g. enable self service, dynamic infrastructure, automate process improvement.

Define Business and IT service offerings in an easy to manage web based Service Catalog.

Translate what you do in Business terms. 

Improve Customer Satisfaction.

Align services and costs to the organisation (clear visibility, transparency).

Provide an effective service contract management process.

Model service specifications using included best practice.

3 key attributes – description of business value or value to the Business, some notion of services cost / price, measurable Service Level Objectives.

Offer SLAs through a Service Catalog (SLM confusion)

Transform from the what to the what if (Business Driven)

Tooling pitch – SLM dashboard etc.

Practical advice with clear examples on where to start, however this was offset by the need to automate service delivery and the tools pitch.  The guidance to model and specify the service is an approach that outsourcing companies have been taking for the last 15 years.  You specify the service to the Business Buyer of the service and the end users.  Start by identifying the various customer groups, their critical business processes, key business events (intra day, weekly, monthly, quarterly). Then move onto classifying their data / information needs and how they will be delivered.

Service Portfolio versus Service Catalog : Are We Clear Yet

Charles Betz, Chris Dancy, Charles Araujo, James Finister

Webcast Vote = 3.5 / 5

What is the benefit of following the ITIL model?  Consistent interpretation and communication.

Self awareness – IT understands itself and how to deliver services to customers.

What level of service should we start at? Typically organisations go straight to the How and get tied up in knots.

Long debate which concluded that “ITIL is textually accurate”.

72% of attendees voted that a wire transfer application and the ordering of new workstations both belong in a Service Catalog.

The customer is a consumer of IT services.  Who is the Customer?

Define services abstractly – look at customer perspective first, from their viewpoint.  Can they interact, buy it.

How do I distinguish between Service Catalog and Request Catalogue?

Service Catalog can provide different views to discrete users.

Understand relationships – Service Catalog should b integrated with Service Level Management (alerts and events)

60% believe that Project Management is a service.

This session did not clarify Service Portfolio vs Service Catalog.  Key questions have been left hanging – Who is The Customer? Where do I start to avoid getting tied up in knots?.  Whilst I appreciate how difficult it must be to have four strong characters in the same session, I can’t help feeling that they should have left their egos at the door.

Important Considerations When Selecting Your Service Catalog Tool

Andreas Antoniou – CTO Biomini

Webcast Vote = 3.7 / 5

Pressing IT Challenges – Unknown Demand, Consumerisation of IT where customers make their own choices, Uncertain Expectations, Unstructured Requests, Inefficient Delivery.

Evolving User Focussed Management by 2014

Revolution in ITSM which will become Device / User Centric.  Consumerisation, Self Service, Mobility and Cloud Services.

Gaining control via the Service Catalog – users want the same speed, flexibility and power to decide in the workplace ( personal vs corporate)

Service Catalog automation reduces wait times.

Managing Demand – reduce inventory, right size capacity, single portal for customers.

Considerations – Static brochure or Actionable (by workflow), Usability, Role Based Access, Configuration not Customisation, Service Lifecycle Management, Approval Routing, Request Fulfilment Automation, Integration, Service Levels, Reporting, Service Components / Items, Content and Internationalisation (language / time zones / currencies…)

Summary – Service Catalog is a highly visible solution.  Put user experience at the centre of your requests.  Prepare Service Catalog content collaboratively with all stakeholders.  Look for flexible content management.

How to build a Service Catalogue in 4 simple steps – Consider, Download, Advice, Get Started.

A key point in the revolution in ITSM was the ITIL Refresh.  There was a push to shift the focus away from ITIL (IT Infrastructure Library) to Service Management Practices.  This will become more apparent with the increase in mobility – anywhere, anytime and cloud service brokerage.  For me the above considerations suggest that there will be a one size fits all tool that is a repository for defined services to the Business Buyer and a service request fulfilment solution for end users.  It could be perceived that this is another example of framing the problem so as to fit with the features of the solution (tool).  Also known as Solution Probleming.

Understanding the Business Case and Investment Return from a Service Catalog

Business Value and Benefits from a Service Catalog Solution

Jeff Moloughney – Front Range

Webcast Vote = 3.9 / 5

Front Range – Advanced Service Management = IT and Non IT Services Portfolio of Out of Box templates. 

Enterprise Workflow Platform of Service Management Suite and Asset Management Suite.

Definition of a Service Catalog – ITIL Service Design, List of IT service offerings, service or product requests, manages workflow, approval land communications.

80% of Service Catalog adopters view Request Fulfilment as important or very important.

Analysis Opinions – IT organisations include Non IT Services – HR, Facilities, Legal in their Service Catalogs.

Business organisations impacted – HR, (Business) Operations, Facilities, Procurement, Provisioning, Workplace Management, Application Services, Finance – Insurance.

List of Service Catalog vendors which includes the usual suspects plus PMG SCS – Service Catalog Suite and Service Ramp (not sure if this bay area company is still around)  

Business Alignment, Strategic Impact and Business Value, Service Delivery Issues

Benefits – User Friendly, single place to go to, sets clear expectations, reduce costs and resources, quicker time to market.

Steps to add value – find areas of the Business affected by requests – e.g. delivery and fulfilment for customers.

Build the business case – interactions, approvals, elapsed time.

Examples – ROI, Calls, Automated Approvals, Workflow Automation.

The principle that Service Providers deliver IT and Non IT services is flawed.  The Non IT services listed are the back office (HR, Finance, Procurement) capabilities consumed by all business units which are better understood than the front office industry specific capabilities.  For example the Patient Administration Service is the horizontal and Choose and Book is the industry vertical that is visible to the customer   The whole request fulfilment debate is that it is a given requirement.  So why do organisations buy Ariba type solutions or build web / intranet functionality to provide P2P procure to pay offerings. In terms of expected benefits a Service Catalog of itself does not result in reduced costs.

Service Catalog – A Practical Approach to Design and Implementation

Mike Kyffin – Technical Business Consultant, Cherwell

Webcast Vote = 4.0 / 5

Need to align across Business View, Customer View and IT View.

What is a Service Catalog? – Designed from the customer perspective.

Why create a Service Catalog? – Transform IT from a technical to a service led organisation.

Service Types – Technical (Email) and Business (AD, Enhancements, Support)

Service Classification – Core IT, Subscription based, On Demand

Service (permissions and user accounts) – category, sub-category, request type

User account management, telephony, network, desktop, email, server administration

e.g. delivery and management of electronic messaging services to and from the company

Service Catalog – urgency / impact / priority / resolution

What can this look like in your Service delivery and Management software?

Tip – implement and maintain a service mindset.   

The guidance in the good book (ITIL 2011 Edition) states that the Service Catalog should contain Business and Technical views.  The above examples are locked in the bowels of Service Operations (e.g. server administration) and the electronic messaging service example is sub optimal.  To make it more relevant it could be restated as – provide details of transaction activity across bank accounts during the working day and report in real-time to customers through their own electronic banking systems and the SWIFT delivery channel. (Business Unit – Treasury Operations)

The need to Transform IT from a technical to a service led organisation and embed a service mindset is key to success. Technical staff (e.g. DBAs) should be taught about their customers and the critical business processes they manage for the particular customer facing service they are supporting. In my experience it is easier to teach an individual with service skills (inter personal) technical know how than it is to teach a technical bod service skills. Being an expert in a technology skill (SFIA) is not sufficient anymore.

Strictly Service Catalog

Barclay Rae – BR Consulting

Webcast Vote = 4.1 / 5

Key Question – does the IT organisation deliver what customers need and can we demonstrate the value delivered?

Does the customer appreciate the value delivered?  Business value innovation

Airline example used – analogy.

What do we mean by services?  Bundle of activities (People, Process, Technology) combined to provide a business outcome.

SLAs – the small print details what it means.

Avoiding Issues – get everyone from IT and the Business together to agree objectives and approach.  Important to get the right people involved.

Customer <-> SLM <-> IT Service Provider

Business Value Reporting – Business Change, Service Design, Service Transition, CSI – CMDB – Incident, Problem, Change – Value Based Delivery

Service Catalog Hierarchy (AXIOS Template) and Service Attributes

Service Catalog Elements – End User Requirements, Business / Customer Service Catalog View, Technical (IT Service Provider) View

Moments of Truth – penny dropped for DBA when it was realised that they supported a service.

7 Step Route Map – Feasibility, Workshop, Customer Liaison, IT Liaison, Service Design, Documentation, Implement (with right skills)

FAST ITSM – we need ITSM to be faster and more agile.

The bundle of activities (People, Process, Technology) is a good place to start but too vague.  The definition of Service Assets (Capabilities and Resources) underpin a service.  The level of warranty (performance) and utility (functionality) determine the Service Level Objective or Target.  As a minimum get the budget holder of a Business Unit, Business Process Owners and the Business Relationship Manager plus the right people together to discuss desired outcomes rather than focus on inputs. The 7 Step Route Map is a proven approach.  More detail is required about FAST ITSM than what is available on the BR website.

How Napster Killed ITIL

Craig McDonagh – Service Now

Webcast Vote = 4.2 / 5

What was so appealing about Napster?

Get just what you needed, create your own albums, access what you needed from home, find what you wanted easily.

Cloud changes everything that was old is new again – Mainframe / Virtualization / Web

Service Management evolves for the cloud.

Service Catalog automation with SLM is absolutely essential.

Cloud management with Service Now

Service Catalog – Service Request – Request Approval – Workflow – Provisioning – Workflow – CMDB Update – IT Governance.

Service Catalog is a resource for the business and a resource for IT

If you don’t have a catalog, Business users will just use a different Service Catalog.

Service Catalog must be as easy to use as iTunes.  totally integrated with Service Management processes, available to everyone, extensible and service centric.

The Business are deciding which Service Catalog to use – Make it Yours

The above example of the 7 steps to get from the Service Request to IT Governance is where internal Service Providers fail.  If request fulfilment is so important is it possible to request a new service?  Typically users can self provision, for example if more compute units for a performance stress test are required these can be delivered by adding virtual machines.  As stated previously Service Requests can be fulfilled by Ariba or a custom solution.  Unfortunately most vendors do not address the Service Specification. In addition it is important to Model and target Service level objectives for Customer Facing services.

Service Catalog : Transforming IT into an App Store

Jason Rosenfield (Cask) & Jason Hopwood (AXIOS)

Webcast Vote = 4.2 / 5

Define Business Services Used.

Create a Service Design package.

Understand the customer experience.

What would your customers expect?

Shift incidents and requests upstream to Tier 0 – self service (upstreaming)

Establish Service Catalog vision – Customer perspective, Business perspective, Technical perspective

(different organisations require different views of a service)

Develop Business Case – identify stakeholders from each “Line of Service”

Evaluate existing services.  Existing list of customer facing services, supporting services are different.

Define service attributes.

Do not try and tackle all services in initial version of the Service Catalog.

Control the Catalog – approve and manage change.

Deploy the Service Catalog – Assess, Design, Pilot, Implement (deploy in consumable phases)

What can AXIUOS and CASK do to help?  CASK has a Cheat SheetTM and SC BuilderTM  (Kick Start)

It is important that Business Units are treated differently so that their needs are understood.  A Service Specification should include the service offerings (customer facing) for each Business Unit e.g. a global Investment Bank will have Wealth, Asset and IB business units each with specific requirements.

The Line of Service approach is very effective.  By taking a Service Line view it is possible to articulate to a Business Owner exactly what and who delivers their service.  The Service Manager or Service Owner is able to provide visibility into who is providing their service from an end to end / front to back perspective.

Service Catalog – It can deliver more value than you think

Matthew Burrows – BSM Impact

Webcast Vote = 4.2 / 5

ISO/IEC 20000-1 is a service management system standard.

Documented catalogue of services (4.3.1 d)

Service provider shall agree a “catalogue of services” with the customer.

Contract Portfolio.  Product and Service Portfolio delivered in line with contract commitments.

Business value demonstrated to end user and the product / service of the organisation as awhole – not just IT.

Service Portfolio – possible inclusions are layers of a service model, BPM, Enterprise Tool and capabilities, Enterprise Data Model, ICT, Suppliers / Partners.

Define services in business terms.

Service Request Catalog

Let’s get a consultant in and leave them to do it.  Important to transfer knowledge to client.

Promise, Measure, Manage

Service Contracts, Service Account Plans (future demand/initiatives and what we plan to deliver), Self Service

Service Catalog, Service Contract, Service Model, SLA, OLA, underpinning contract

Business Services – two types – business process (Payroll, Billing) and business product / services (Voice, SMS)

Service Contract – what we deliver.  Service Catalog – what can be delivered.

Service Model should be developed for each business service.

Service Cost Management – cost allocation, TCO, Benchmarking.

Pointers – model how services support the business.

We must understand our Business (not just IT)

ISO/IEC 20000 is all about “should” and “shall” and the statements should not be seen as discrete requirements.  The standard together with ITIL describes what to do but not how to do it. Consultants will increasingly be engaged directly by the (frustrated) Business because they have relevant industry knowledge and can model how business processes are enabled by Information Services. Not sure why an Internal Service Provider should need a Contract Portfolio.  External Service Providers have a contract with a defined “schedule of services”.

Service Catalog – 4 Decisions for Execution Success

Ivanka Menken – The Art of Service

Webcast Vote = 4.5 / 5

IT staff confuse a “service” as perceived by the customer with an IT system.

Business Catalog is a pre sales document. The Technical Catalog underpins the Business Catalog.

4 Decisions

  1. Who are you serving? – Business or external Customers
  2. People – Hire Attitude, Train Skills, Appoint a Service Catalog Manager
  3. Cash – budget for service not just products
  4. Execution

Where to start?  Create a draft catalog.  Discuss with stakeholders, Update catalog, Use catalog for SLA negotiations.

Business getting IT’ed

Presenter is the author of a book about Business Relationship Management.  So there is a service culture and mindset engrained in the above approach.  The Business Catalog is not a pre-sales document it is a living repository describing a set of customer facing services.  If the Technical catalog and the Configuration management system are so important, what will happen when services are provided from in the cloud and appear as a black box.

Service Catalog  Challenges in a Multi Vendor Environment

Managing a Catalog of IT Enabled Services in a Multi Vendor Environment

Bill Powell – Zenetex

Webcast Vote = 4.5 / 5

Services are intangible and non storable.  They cannot be managed until they are defined.

What is a Service Catalog? One or more repositories of available IT enabled services.

Realization -= SPM – Service Product Manager / Order to Activation – Request

Basic Service Provider Requirements

  • Establish a catalogue of service descriptions with the customer.
  • Maintain an up to date catalog.
  • Update Service Catalog when new or changed services are introduced.
  • Review with the Customer at planned intervals.

RACI matrix with Service Product Manager – Accountable and the CIO – Responsible

In a Multi Vendor environment who is responsible for integrating the enterprise Service Catalog?

Do Service Providers have agreements with each other?

Internal Service Provider, Service Integrator as a separate provider, External Service Provider.

No one supplier is responsible for end-to-end services.

New Catalog Requirements

  • Integrated trusted source of available services
  • Cross supplier standards to enable integrated view
  • Cross supplier dependencies included in Service Descriptions

Critical Success Factors – Catalog Information Integration, Tools Integration, Catalog Support.

As to be expected from the mentor of the ITILv3 Service Strategy core volume, sound advice which reflects where most organisations are today and will be moving to in the future.  Internal Service Providers are dinosaurs because they do not have the breadth of capabilities required to provide value to the Business at the right price point.  Given this it is important that a “Retained Organisation” of, senior and few in number, personnel is established who have experience of managing in Multi Vendor environments and are able to stitch together the components (Service Assets) of the end to end service.  The members of the “Retained Organisation” should be hybrids in that they understand both the Business and IS.

Service Catalog and Cloud Computing : No Catalog No Cloud

Rodrigo Flores – Cisco

Webcast Vote = 4.6 / 5

Explosion in the amount of Information

Growth of connected devices

Explosion of Apps and Social Media (AppXchange, Google Apps, iPhone, Amazon Web Services)

Very beginning of a major shift – “Big Switch”, Nicholas Carr. The significance of a shift to Cloud Computing.

Rich Service Models Evolve – BYOPC (Build Your Own PC), Oauth (ID Access Management), IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service – Data centre)

The power of Cloud – pooled resources, delivered as service.

Cloud based IT Delivery Model.  Corporate, Marketing, Finance, Engineering, HR

Step One – Service Catalog is standard, componentized, technical service offerings, ready for automation. Self-service.  What’s new is the focus on automation processes.

Step Two – make it actionable

Overview of CITEIS (Gen2) orchestration, provisioning, availability, support and maintenance windows, order fulfilment.

CISCO IT benefits – Agility and TCO reduction

Recommendation – Crawl, Walk, Run

Step Three – implement a roadmap for standard offerings in your catalog  

All things “Cloud” are very topical and cannot be ignored because they will have a major impact as organisations look for agility and value for money.  The explosion of big data and information along with increasing use of mobility options means that IT is no longer in control.  Customers and corporate users have a bigger say / voice in how they consume services.

For me the presentation went off message with the overview of CITEIS.  CISCO purchased newScale and have force fitted / diluted the functionality to focus on CISCO products and services rather than what the customer wants.

Key Observations

 (reply to whatdoesgoodlooklike@gmail.com or @WDGLL)

IT only exists to serve the Business.  The Business increasingly treat IT as a commodity and if the Internal Service Provider is not demonstrating value against higher expectations then the Business will bypass IS and commission services from alternate providers.

It is disappointing that the (IT) Service Management industry has not addressed a key dependency required to create a meaningful Service Catalog.  IT is still detached from the Business.  BITA – Business IT Alignment, Business Service Management, Business Technology Management were meant to bridge the service expectation gap.  IT still expect to talk about technical widgets whilst the Business has much more understanding of how to communicate what outcomes they expect and have little interest in the how it is delivered. 

I have coined a term for the fact that IS is tightly integrated with the Business – “bISness”   

It is important to promote and engender a service culture and mindset by arranging for IS personnel to walk in the shoes of the customer.  This can be easily achieved through being aware of the day in the life of their business counterpart.  Alternatively encourage staff to co-locate with the Business areas they provide day to day support in order to improve understanding of how their actions enable business operation.

Here is a 3 step approach to obtain the information that is required in order to create a Service Catalog.

Step 1 – Create a Service Specification

This Service Specification defines the scope of Service(s) offered to the Business by Service Provider, how the Service(s) will be managed and how performance of these Service(s) will be measured.

The Service Specification is intended to create a common understanding of service priorities, agree responsibilities and articulate the expectations and obligations of both parties.  To work effectively, it must be viewed as a two-way living document with both the Business and the Retained Organisation having shared expectations and mutual obligations.

Step 2 – Define Customer Groups

It is important to appropriately define Customer Groups within your organisation.  Understanding the specific requirements of each Customer Group will enable the Service Provider to better manage expectations and achieve improved levels of customer satisfaction.  Customer Groups are logical groupings within the Business to which services are provided.  Each Customer Group may have different service level needs.

Customer Groups can also be further divided into Customer Types.  Customer Types are users in Customer Groups with similar service requirements.

Step 3 – Define the Service Model

Describe the critical interactions between the Business / end user  and the Service Provider setting out the end to end view – Tier 1 (Service Desk), Tier 2 (Support), Tier 3 (3rd Party S/W vendor)

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